How Deep The Rabbit Hole Goes

How Deep The Rabbit Hole Goes

Several recent posts deal with the effort to tear down the family, the borders between adults and children (part of a hatred of boundaries I'd already noted..), and the story of Moira Greyland. First - I came across from this piece by Paul Lucas, “Do What Thou Wilt Shall Be the Whole of the Law”. It's actually the second part of a series. It opens with a lengthly discussion of writing for the audience vs writing for other authors (aka, why, despite my liking for Rush and other odds and ends of prog rock, I find a lot of it…

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The Mercenary

The Mercenary

Recently they mentioned Pournelle's The Mercenary over at the Castalia House blog. In the summer between middle and high schools, shortly after moving to a new school system yet again due to the usual military brat lifestyle, I hit up the new library and found a beat up book in the spinner of those they were trying to sell off to make room with a muscular semi-futuristic soldier holding a rifle against an orange background. I was already familiar with Boris Vallejo though it wasn't his best, but the author caught my eye. Pournelle. I had yet to read more…

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Happy Halloween

Happy Halloween

Daddy Warpig, at both Geek Gab, and at Castalia, reviewed the new Halloween release. He brings up mostly the same set of strengths and weaknesses in the movie in both, though in the (I presume) latter Castalia review, he comes across a bit less happy about the movie. Now, I'm a huge fan of his reviews, and usually find them spot on, but in this case, I have to differ with him. First - one of the things DW pointed out on geek gab is simply not true. I think this is in part because he hasn't seen the original…

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Soda Pop Soldier

Soda Pop Soldier

Ages ago I read what was – at the time, for a younger self – a “groundbreaking” book by Neal Stephenson called Snow Crash. It was an interesting blend of real and virtual word technothriller, had some interesting ideas, a fun opening chapter, and despite putting out a number of books I’ve gladly reread like *Anathem, *SC did not age well. Mostly for it’s self-awareness, as demonstrated most clearly by the name of our viewpoint character, Hiro Protagonist. Nick Cole’s Soda Pop Soldier gets compared a lot to Ready Player One but I think this is another case of…

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Final Memoirs

Final Memoirs

John Ringo’s sheer volume of output is legendary. Also the fact that an idea jumps into his head, and the next thing anyone knows, there’s another book series waiting to be edited. The last is pretty much the story of how John Ringo ended up writing a series of books set in Larry Correia’s Monster Hunter universe. I’d reviewed the first book previously. The third and final book in the series – Monster Hunter Memoirs: Saints – has just been released a little over a week ago. In the second book, Chad moves to New Orleans. A few…

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Long Boats, Iron Men

Long Boats, Iron Men

The Dream of the Iron Dragon: An Alternate History Viking Epic is the the type of “alternate history” that’s been around since Twain’s “A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court” – a man of our time goes to the past, and starts changing things. Like Flint’s “1632” series, and Stirling’s Nantucket series, it’s not just one man. Like Weber’s Apocalypse Troll, you can throw out the “from our time” aspect. Our protagonists are from our future, the crew of an exploration ship desperately searching for possible boltholes for humanity to retreat to stumbles into…

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Baby Driver

Baby Driver

I took the plunge, World’s End notwithstanding, and went to see Baby Driver. Short version – if you sat through the trailers and said “hell, yeah” – the movie is exactly what they sold you. Go, watch it. That said, I’m torn. Where once in the past I was more amenable to “stylish” and directly artistic movies, I have much less patience with, say, Tarantino flicks, than I used to be. It’s very overtly and deliberately stylistic, often enough in ways that call themselves to your attention. Yet, I’ve been thinking about aspects of it, its themes, its…

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Review: Blame

Review: Blame

What do you get when you cross Gregory Benford’s Great Sky River with a spaghetti western? Blame. A brief voiceover gives us the setting. In the far, *far* future where humanity lost the ability to communicate with the city it constructed, that they lived in, and so the city deemed them illegal residents, and began to exterminate humanity. Our story starts generations later. An aside. Yes. Given the word choice, I’m sure some people would love to make it about the current immigration kerfluffle, but keep in mind this is a Japanese comic from 20-30 years ago, and…

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