Nolan vs PC?

Nolan vs PC?

There are days that I wonder what Nolan, the man behind Tenet, Interstellar, and Dunkirk, is up to. He's obviously in the system, and regarded enough to have men like Michael Caine and Mat Damon eagerly take part in his movies. On the other hand, almost every recent movie is a giant fuck you to globalist and leftist shibboleths in some way shape or form. MementoThis is one that doesn't quite fit the mold, as the trend I'm noting is a more recent change. I think the point Wright made in his review of Tenet is well put - it…

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Tenet

Tenet

A while back I said I would write of Tenet, and didn't - in large part for the selfsame reasons that John C Wright points out in the beginning of his multi-part review of the movie, that to say almost anything of it is to spoil it. I generally don't believe in spoilers, and the movie holds up to multiple viewings, but I also want to maximize how much of it is caught fresh the first time, so I'll try to stick with what is obvious, or at least strongly implied, by the trailer. It starts as a spy thriller…

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Red Sea

Red Sea

If you told me 10 years ago that I'd prefer watching outright chinese commie propaganda more than most of what comes out of Hollywood, I'd have called you nuts. While I'd previously seen Wandering Earth and a few other movies originated out of China, and you could see the worldview/assumptions working in the background, it wasn't until watching Operation Red Sea - filmed entirely in cooperation with the PLA Navy as a "Chinese Navy Seals go to the Shores of Tripoli" - that I'd watched such an obvious and forthright propaganda film to push Chinese interests, attitudes, and aims.…

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Interstellar, Again

Interstellar, Again

MOTW has a post up on "Peak Hollywood" and how everything coming out in the near future is a sequel. I fully agree that Interstellar is likely the best film of the last several decades. Dunkirk was also amazing. Time to queue it back up and watch it again. Don't miss the link to the review by John C Wright. As an aside, the number of clueless idiots who bashed on the treatment of love in teh film as "new agey" still shocks me.…

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Pop Kult

Via Castalia house, an excellent post on how pop culture is more accurately, as Brian Neimeier puts it, Pop Kult (or "Cult"). The Epistle of Captain America – The Pop Cult is Truly a Cult That said, I do think he's overlooked something: When my viewers were upset about the corporate destruction of Star Wars, calling the franchise a cultural institution, I thought it a bit hyperbolic – after all, these are just stories, and you can’t uncreate what George Lucas did. I see things better now. Star Wars is part of the religious reverence for popular franchises. When Disney…

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The War to End All Wars

The War to End All Wars

The short version? Go see 1917. It's a solid war movie. If I had a quibble it's that they compressed nearly 24 hours into just a few while at the same time, except for a period of unconsciousness, showing you the events in two apparently continuous shots. There was certainly less overt antiwar messaging than I would have expected. The background music, while not Zimmer, is similar to his more recent soundscape-style work. From a technical perspective, it's an amazing achievement of steadicam work.…

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Norwegiean Cinema: A Bit of Dark Humor.

Norwegiean Cinema: A Bit of Dark Humor.

If you're looking for a couple of the films I mentioned, you may come across several others. One of which involves a snowplow driver who goes on the vengeance trail to kill the drug dealers who murdered his son, sparking a war between two factions of drug dealers. If you're thinking, "But, that Liam Neeson movie, Cold Pursuit, isn't out yet," you'd be right. I'm talking about the Norwegian movie that inspired it, with the english title In Order of Disappearance who's original title translates more literally as "the work of idiots." First, the bad. This is a Nordic film.…

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Norwegian Cinema: The Wave

Norwegian Cinema: The Wave

My introduction to Norwegian cinema didn't start with the recently mentioned Kon Tiki. For that matter, it didn't start with the movie I'm discussing today, but if I recall, with either the Netflix series Lillyhammer, or a dark little piece called Headhunters. While both were okay, the first one that actually impressed me was a disaster movie I found mentioned over on Quintus Curtius's blog called simply The Wave, or Bølgen. The movie is inspired by several rockslides which, in the confines of the narrow fjords, have caused huge title waves, killing dozens of people. Similar events included the Lituya…

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