Solomon Kane

Solomon Kane

In our sadly simplified age we tend to either have overtly, almost desperately, happy or overtly grimdark (and these are sold as "intelligent", and "real"), and I know far too many who see a dark tale of virtue and hope and cannot see the light at the end, as if it's been trained out. I ended up watching the movie version of Solomon Kane due to the recommendation of Razorfist (and if you dig up the youtube video, the recommended book of collected stories is well worth every penny), and it was outstanding. First, the downside.…

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Nor Ogre Tears

I've got a soft spot in my heart for Alan Dean Foster. I don't think anyone would accuse the man of being a great writer, but he was certainly a consistent workman and craftsman who could tell a decent tale. He could take a movie script and turn it into an engaging read, but was also a prolific writer with several series of books of his own, as well as one-offs and short stories. His "Why Johnny Can't Drive" was one of the listed inspirations for Steve Jackson Games Car Wars. Most of the other short stories collected…

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Final Memoirs

Final Memoirs

John Ringo’s sheer volume of output is legendary. Also the fact that an idea jumps into his head, and the next thing anyone knows, there’s another book series waiting to be edited. The last is pretty much the story of how John Ringo ended up writing a series of books set in Larry Correia’s Monster Hunter universe. I’d reviewed the first book previously. The third and final book in the series – Monster Hunter Memoirs: Saints – has just been released a little over a week ago. In the second book, Chad moves to New Orleans. A few…

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Catching Up

I’ve been forced to prioritize time a bit the last few days with weather-related fallout at work (lightning can do crazy things) and some time that had been set aside for family, and blogging fell behind consistent workouts and sleep. That said, it’s been productive. So a few notes/etc. First, the sad news that Christopher Stasheff is no longer with us. From Cedar Sanderson’s blog: You see, I first read Chris’ work as a teen way back in the dimly remembered days of the 70s. His first work was A Warlock In Spite Of Himself in…

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Review: The Unexpected Enlightenment of Rachel Griffin

Review: The Unexpected Enlightenment of Rachel Griffin

I normally would not pick up a YA book. But John C Wright is a fantastically literate and aware author who’s integrity in making recommendations I trust, and in posts and comments his wife, L. Jagi Lamplighter, has been warm, very well spoken, and insightful. So I decided to give her book, The Unexpected Enlightenment of Rachel Griffin, a shot. The short version is that I am very glad I did. From Amazon: Nestled amidst the beauty of New York’s Hudson Highlands and hidden from the eyes of the Unwary, Roanoke Academy is a place of magic and…

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On Seagulls and Greatness

On Seagulls and Greatness

Over at Seagull Rising Jon Mollison discusses Cora Buhlert and her lack of awareness of what she refers to. Cora B in bold…. *Does anybody else find the idea of a rabid puppy taking inspiration from Jonathan Livingston Seagull of all things as funny as I do? Of course she thinks it’s funny.  She doesn’t know what you’re talking about.  Jonathan Livingston Seagull is the story of a seagull whose unwillingness to conform to the demands of the crowd results in his expulsion from the flock.  It was adopted by the hippy-dippy movement in the 1970s as…

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How Different Is It?

How Different Is It?

Chris Jones over at Classic RPG Realms writes how D&D and AD&D were two different games. Looking around at what I’ve heard and seen of 5e (no, have not played it), what I’d played of the original basic (mostly Keep on the Borderlands) and AD&D (a fair bit including some heavy home-ruling) and Pathfinder, I think he has a point that other games evolved more from original D&D. I think AD&D evolved from the other more than he believes, it needs some distilling, but even ACKs, which I…

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Pure Awesomeness Now Available in Paperback

Pure Awesomeness Now Available in Paperback

Larry Correia, aka the Mountain Who Writes, has a new-ish epic fantasy series out, and has announced that the first book, Son of the Black Sword, is now out in paperback. If you have yet to read this book, put it at the top, or near the top, of your reading pile. It goes in a lot of unexpected but utterly reasonable directions, in a fantasy milieux quite unlike most others – and one that would be far more familiar to students of Jeffro Johnson’s “Appendix N” overview. Larry gets better with each book.…

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